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The Top 10 Greatest Architects in History – Part 2

The architect from China made his way to the U.S. as a teenager to study before becoming one of modern architecture’s greater-ever architects. Close to eight decades later, his work can be seen globally, known for its distinct application of geometric forms, as well as Chinese influences. 

The Top 10 Greatest Architects in History – Part 2

Ieoh Ming Pei

His National Center for Atmospheric Research in Colorado embodies his geometric forms, along with unity with elements of nature in their surroundings. His work is visible in the world’s most prestigious acclaimed and government sites.

Philip Johnson

Johnson is known as the architect who founded MOMA’s Department of Architecture and Design. His works are very easily recognisable. His Connecticut glass house ranks among the most recognisable residencies thanks to its minimal interiors. The impressive way he uses crystal, steel, and glass made him famous throughout the world.

The Crystal Cathedral in California, which wouldn’t have looked out of place in a fairytale book, is a great example of innovative architecture and perfectly illustrates Johnson’s Pop-Art and Minimalism styles.

Ludwig Mies van der Rohe

Also known as “Mies”, this German-American is regarded as being among modern architectures pioneers, in the same group as Walter Gropius and Le Corbusier. Mies was famous for his minimalist architectural style and his innovative way of using structural steel and plate glass to break up interiors. That innovation is one of his more recognisable traits.

A great number of his interior concepts and furniture styles are used frequently in today’s interiors and architecture. His more well-known projects include Chicago’s Crown Hall, New York City’s Seagram Building, Berlin’s New National Gallery, and the Barcelona Pavilion.

Renzo Piano

The architect, who was born in Italy, was ranked among the most influential people by Time magazine in 2008. The Italian Pritzker prize-winner has played such a huge role in the shaping of modern architecture that he deserves to be fully recognised for it.

The Shard, which stands in London and is the tallest skyscraper in Europe, has divided opinion since the beginning but many people believe that it helped to bring London into the 21st century. In his earlier days, he worked with another famous architect, Louis Khan, before becoming known for a distinct approach to using materials and details.

Jean Nouvel

The architect, who was born in France, has won a number of honours and awards for various projects. He shot to global fame after he won the design competition for Paris’ Arab World Institute. His work is now known throughout the world and his unique architectural concepts distinguish his work from that or other modern architects. Among his most notable projects are Prague’s Ziaty Andel, Tokyo’s Dentsu Building, and Paris’ Arab World Institute.

Moshe Safdie

Another of Louis Khan’s apprentices, Sadie has enjoyed an impressive career in modern architecture. The architect is famous for his 1967 International & Universal Exposition – Expo 67, which was the main celebration in Canada’s centennial year, and was regarded as a stunning cultural achievement.

Moshe Safdie