Home » Architecture » New York’s Most Impressive Buildings Part 2

New York’s Most Impressive Buildings Part 2

The Guggenheim Museum

The Guggenheim Museum was the final project from Frank Lloyd Wright. It also gave the new world a new way to think about museum architecture. While the building received its fair share of criticism upon opening- some calling it “a giant toilet bowl”- it has fortunately grown its reputation over time. In fact, it’s every bit as breathtaking as the art contained within it. Its one-of-a-kind interior trialling ramp guides visitors throughout the collections of artworks. Wright’s intention was to enable art lovers to communicate with the art in a meaningful way. The building continues to inspire architects, who were given proof that a building’s design can be a work of art in itself. Such masters as Frank Gehry and Zaha Hadid certainly learned this lesson.

United Nations Headquarters

To conjure up the ideal design for a building that would be the headquarters for the United Nations, a collection of some of the best architectural minds in the world was formed. This collection included Oscar Niemeyer, Le Corbusier, and others from Australia, Belgium, China, the UK, and Sweden. Ultimately, projects submitted by Niemeyer and Le Corbusier were combined to create the architectural masterpiece that is now one of the most iconic buildings in New York. The complex, which was constructed in the International Style, overlooks the East River, and sees more than one million of visitors walk through its doors each year.

New York City Hall

Constructed from 1803-1812, City Hall is the most significant building in New York. That isn’t just because the Mayor’s office is here, either. It’s every bit as important for its architectural grandeur. This can sometimes be forgotten due to the high-rises around City Hall Park. Once you’re approaching the building, however, it’s impossible not to notice the marvel of French Renaissance Rival and Georgian elegance. There is a wealth of history attached to the building. Two Presidents (Ulysses S. Grant and Abraham Lincoln) lay in state here after their passing. It’s also known for 1857’s Policeman’s Riot. This saw factions fighting for control over the city’s law enforcement. On one side was the newly established Metropolitan Police, established by the New York State legislature, and on the other side was the New York Municipal Police, who were famously corrupt and answered to Mayor Fernando Wood. A fight broke out between the two sides in front of the hall.

New York City Hall
New York City Hall

The Dakota

One of the most exclusive and prestigious coop buildings in Manhattan, the Dakota was constructed in 1884 on the corner of Central Park West and 72nd Street. In those days, there was hardly anything else around it. Its arrival, however, heralded an Upper West Side luxury housing boom. Its profusion of dormers and gabled rooftop make it immediately recognisable. The building is arranged around a central courtyard. It was also used in the terrifying classic movie Rosemary’s Baby, as well as being the setting for a real-life crime in 1980: the murder of iconic Beatle-turned-solo-musician John Lennon.

One of the most exclusive and prestigious coop buildings in Manhattan, the Dakota was constructed in 1884 on the corner of Central Park West and 72nd Street. In those days, there was hardly anything else around it. Its arrival, however, heralded an Upper West Side luxury housing boom. Its profusion of dormers and gabled rooftop make it immediately recognisable. The building is arranged around a central courtyard. It was also used in the terrifying classic movie Rosemary’s Baby, as well as being the setting for a real-life crime in 1980: the murder of iconic Beatle-turned-solo-musician John Lennon.